June 30, 2016

YOUR CARRIER: HENRY SACHA, DETROIT TIMES, 1944

Detroit Times, June 6, 1944
If synchronicity exists in the human realm then Henry Jacob Sacha will be found among the pages of the few copies of Bars and Stripes that I have lying around somewhere. That is, if indeed the boy featured above became the man shown below:


The dates, photographs and information seem to coincide so I'll assume that the former featured paperboy in the June 6, 1944 edition of the Detroit Times became a Lieutenant for the Detroit Police.

If not, let's not lose track of the young Henry Sacha who delivered the newspaper on Caniff and Gallagher to his 72 subscribers. Earning him $9 a week and several awards for excellence along the way.

The young man who lived at 12045 Lumpkin in Detroit maintained a B+ average at St. Florian school while also playing catcher in baseball, softball for the Times carrier league and participating in the Holy Name Society at school.

He had hopes to attend Yale and become a metallurgist. Becoming a cop seemed to have worked out just fine for him.

June 29, 2016

IT'S A HIT!....STROH'S BEER AND TIGER BASEBALL ADVERT, 1968


With the recent announcement that a refurbished Stroh's using the original European pilsner recipe would once again be brewed in Detroit this advertisement becomes that much more relevant.

It's from the 1968 publication Tips From the Tigers which was written by Joe Falls and the Detroit Tigers staff, or so says the frontis piece introduction. The booklet will be featured on this blog at some point when I have copious amounts of time to do such time-consuming scanning and editing. The main pictures in this post shall be included.


It was obviously a Stroh's promotional or giveaway and appears to be from the 1968 Championship season. Since baseball collectibles are pretty common I usually won't pick something up unless it has great advertising, which this one does. Well, anything with a Stroh's can or bottle on it is great to me. Greater yet will be drinking a Stroh's while blogging with the Tigers game providing the background ambience.

June 28, 2016

BUY A WAR BOND: FIRE A TOMMY GUN, "DETROIT TIMES" ARTICLE, 1944

Detroit Times, June 6, 1944
Imagine a Detroit newspaper teaming up with a car company to encourage people to buy war bonds by enticing them with the opportunity to shoot a tommy gun. A trendy hipster of today would guffaw with contempt at the notion before passing out at the mere sight of A GUN.

The Thompson submachine gun fired .45 caliber bullets, at a rate of 747 per minute, that Chrysler was producing at its Evansville, Indiana plant. Each purchaser at the Army Air Show was allowed to shoot 50 rounds at a Tojo target and were also given a souvenir poster of the dictator at the end of their mission.

Needless to say the gun was in use nearly nonstop during the event with top buyer, Alvin K. Slack, purchasing a $1,000 bond in his quest to get Tojo.

June 27, 2016

TWO PHOTOS OF PEOPLE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE JAMES SCOTT MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN AT BELLE ISLE, 1937


Does it matter that the glorious white marble fountain bedecking Belle Isle's crown was born of the rare beneficience of a scoundrel? It did to the moral factions of the church elders of Detroit in the 1910s. And J. L. Hudson himself, who said of a proposed fountain and monument to James Scott--playboy, rapscallion and hell-raiser extraordinaire-- “Mr. Scott never did anything for Detroit in his lifetime and he never had a thought that was good for the city.”

But after years of debate the city of Detroit, under Mayor Breitmeyer, determined that the bequeathed fortune was too great a gift to the citizens to refuse on moral grounds. So the grand monument was erected in 1925. It remains today though some refurbishment has been necessary to maintain the structure.


On the day when Dustin Hoffman was born, August 8, 1937, in the waning years of the Great Depression, these presumed Detroiters were dressed in their Sunday best. And with good reason because it was indeed the first day of the week. All while james Scott watched from his perch eternally dreaming of mischief.